Think Of Staffing Like Joint Commission Does

Every hospital in the country has heard of the Joint Commissions on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), even if they don’t use them for reviewing their hospital standards. JCAHO is known to be tough, with a great emphasis on regulations and rules for every area of consideration a hospital has to address, even down to things such as putting stoppers in doors (they don’t like that).

Something many people might not know is that JCAHO also has thoughts on proper staffing levels at hospitals, including interim staffing standards. Though not specific to the revenue cycle, it’s interesting to see some of what they believe:

* At least once a year, an organization must provide its Board of Directors with written reports on: (i) all system or process failures; (ii) the number and types of sentinel events; (iii) whether the patient/resident and their families were informed of the event; (iv) all proactive and responsive actions taken to improve staffing safety; and (v) all results of analyses related to the adequacy of staffing.

* When an organization identifies undesirable patterns, trends, or variation in its performance related to the safety or quality of care, it includes the adequacy of staffing in its analysis of possible causes.

* When analysis reveals a problem with the adequacy of staffing, an organization’s leaders responsible for patient/resident safety are informed of the results of this analysis and action is taken to resolve the identified problems.

* At least once a year, an organization’s leaders responsible for the patient/resident safety program review a written report of the results of any analysis related to the adequacy of staffing and any actions taken to resolve identified problems.

Overall, it’s a great outline to use when thinking about staffing levels at your hospital in all departments. As it pertains to the revenue cycle, verifying that there’s enough staff to handle all outstanding claims is critical to the success of the billing department. Making sure that there’s someone who understands how a charge master works and why it’s critical to the success of a hospital’s financial standing is important. Making sure things such as denials, secondary billing, and even proper collection efforts are taken care of might mean taking a look at staffing and determining that interim staff is needed to help address these issues.

Sometimes, you just might need an interim consultant to come in and take a critical look at your organization, especially if those already in leadership positions are too close or too entrenched to give the effort a fair appraisal. Often the claim is that it costs too much money to bring in interim staff, no matter what level they’re at. The reality is that the money you spend just might be the different in ending the year above or below budget, based on what interim staffing can do for you.

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