How To Use Interim Staff

Often, we place a person at a hospital or physician’s office with the expectation that they’ll be doing one kind of work. Then we learn later that, instead of doing what we sent them to do, they’re not only working something different, but have been given supervisory responsibility that, unfortunately, we may not be getting paid for, and thus, the person we’ve placed isn’t getting paid properly for either.

Staffing companies look for the best candidates to do a host of things for them. A company like Expeditive, for instance, sometimes has management level staff that we can provide that also will do regular billing projects as a change of pace. That’s a benefit to us because it gives us more flexibility in placing people in all sorts of places. But it can also be a detriment when those we contract with decide to use those people in ways that aren’t fair to the employee, especially if that person has a more extensive background and, thus is suddenly more valuable to the facility, than they had originally asked for.

Sometimes, the reverse happens. We’ll place a person somewhere because we’ve been asked for someone with a particular set of skills, then when they show up they’re asked to do a job that those skills don’t fit. Not all people who’ve done registration can do billing, and vice versa. And not all people who have been billing for 20 years have the skills to lead others.

It’s important that, when hospitals or physicians come to the conclusion that they need some assistance, they’re able to tell the staffing companies just what it is they need. And it’s also important that staffing companies try to obtain as much information from you as they can get so that they have a better chance of giving you exactly what you need, while being fair to the person being placed.

We’re pretty good, but like everyone else, we’re only as good as the information we’re given. With a proper conversation, both sides will always get a win.

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